Discussion: economics of labour migration

31 08, 2019

$8,000 for the underground agent

2019-09-15T13:06:48+08:00August 31st, 2019|Articles, Stories|

Foreign workers are increasingly becoming illegal job agents, preying on fellow countrymen like Alamin wanting to come to Singapore. This underground activity puts Singapore's law and order reputation at risk.

27 05, 2019

More of here, less of there: Increase in repeat workers and fat profits for the underground job broker in Singapore

2019-08-30T16:30:43+08:00May 27th, 2019|Articles, Facts, research, analysis, Media Coverage, News, Our Stand|

In this research study, TWC2 found that about 80% of South Asian workers were "repeat workers", a huge change from a few years ago. We also found that about half of them used a Singapore-based job broker to find a job. Typically, these are foreign workers themselves, not licensed employment agents. It's illicit but profitable.

10 05, 2019

Transfer was a sham, settlement agreement was dubious, only the paddyfield was real

2019-08-30T16:30:43+08:00May 10th, 2019|Articles, Stories|

By Yasha S based on an interview in January 2019 For 47-year old labourer Motaleb Abdul, seeking justice for what he is owed seems like a never-ending game of disappointment. Despite having a salary settlement agreement drawn by Tripartite Alliance for Dispute Management (TADM), he has yet to be paid by his Singaporean boss

1 04, 2019

MOM claims great effectiveness in a case when the facts point otherwise

2019-08-30T16:30:44+08:00April 1st, 2019|Articles, Stories|

The Ministry of Manpower (MOM) responded to our 20 Feb 2019 article 'Rahman and employer agree to settle salary claim... then nothing happens' with a statement on their website. That statement amplifies their ability to help, and implicitly accuses the worker of not seeking help when help was (said to be) available. The worker's misery

16 02, 2019

Are foreign workers abusing WIC claims?

2019-08-30T16:30:45+08:00February 16th, 2019|Articles, Facts, research, analysis|

By Debbie Fordyce The first graph (below) suggests that a disproportionate number of Indian and Bangladeshi migrant workers lodge injury claims within the first six months of starting a job. Moreover, TWC2's observation is that many of these injuries are minor and result in little compensation or will heal completely, thus meriting no disability compensation