20 02, 2019

Rahman and employer agree to settle salary claim… then nothing happens

2019-08-30T16:30:45+08:00February 20th, 2019|Articles, Stories|

By Grace Chua, based on an interview in August 2018 It has been three months since Rahman Mostafizur filed a salary claim with the Ministry of Manpower (MOM). Having started work in March 2017, he was dismayed to note that his salary was unilaterally reduced throughout the fourteen months of employment. Before joining Kah Development

16 02, 2019

Are foreign workers abusing WIC claims?

2019-08-30T16:30:45+08:00February 16th, 2019|Articles, Facts, research, analysis|

By Debbie Fordyce The first graph (below) suggests that a disproportionate number of Indian and Bangladeshi migrant workers lodge injury claims within the first six months of starting a job. Moreover, TWC2's observation is that many of these injuries are minor and result in little compensation or will heal completely, thus meriting no disability compensation

7 01, 2019

Eight men surround Raju at a coffeeshop

2019-08-30T16:30:45+08:00January 7th, 2019|Articles, Stories|

We first featured Raju in the story To encash two cheques, Raju had to jump through hoops, which was about his last three days before going home. Prior to that, he was having difficulty getting due settlement of his injury compensation claim and this story below is about an incident during that period. -- By

27 12, 2018

Salary non-payment was first sign, then all workers lost their jobs

2019-08-30T16:30:45+08:00December 27th, 2018|Articles, Stories|

By Mohamed Kasshif, based on an interview in September 2018 “Boss say, don’t worry, still can work”; Zobayar explains the reply he got from his employer upon realising that his work permit had been revoked without notice. It’s been two months since he last received his salary and now he lost his work permit, making

18 12, 2018

From overcharging to plain flouting of the law — Ratan’s story

2019-08-30T16:30:45+08:00December 18th, 2018|Articles, Stories|

By Katia Barthelemy, based on an interview in August 2018 Each migrant worker’s story is unique. Yet, in all the stories we hear at TWC2, we can detect injustice, lack of respect, abuse, illegal treatment or a combination of them. Miah Mohammad Ratan, like most migrant workers in Singapore, started his journey out of Bangladesh

15 12, 2018

In-Principle Approval: uses and abuses 2011 – 2018, introduction

2019-08-30T16:30:45+08:00December 15th, 2018|Articles, Facts, research, analysis|

Introduction Accompanying this introduction is a six-part series of articles that spotlights the In-Principle Approval for a Work Permit (“IPA”), a key document in the import of foreign labour into Singapore. Behind the document is a process that, over time, has shown several weaknesses. What began as a document and process with a laudable aim

12 12, 2018

When medical leave wages take leave of the law

2019-08-30T16:30:46+08:00December 12th, 2018|Articles|

By Ada Cheong, based on interviews conducted in September 2018 Singapore is reputed to be a business-friendly place. A phalanx of blue-green skyscrapers -- our central business district -- rises up just behind the Merlion. The area is bustling with people in suits and work dresses, working for multinational companies and investors: banks, insurance companies, and

8 12, 2018

Some days the skies are clear and problems float away

2019-08-30T16:30:46+08:00December 8th, 2018|Articles, Happenings, Media Coverage, News, Stories|

"Migrant workers volunteer to clean Pasir Ris beach on Saturday" said the headline in the Straits Times, 17 October 2018. Indeed, that's what a large group of TWC2 clients did, led by Irene Ong and Marcel Bandur, joint leaders of our Discover Singapore team. This team organises activities for the workers under our care every