Tag Archives: Job mobility

Type of issue: changing jobs without repatriation

TWC2’s top three recommendations

In late June 2017, Channel NewsAsia asked Transient Workers Count Too for a commentary article with the suggested theme of “whether we think migrant workers are an integral part of Singapore society, following reports of how many have to head back given the slowing economy.” The article we submitted (in early July) is below. After we  Continue Reading »

Straits Times: Help migrant workers stand up for their own safety

The commentary below was published in the Straits Times, 25 October 2017. John Gee For The Straits Times They form majority of workers in workplaces with high accident rates and deserve more targeted help measures Singapore has set itself the target of significantly reducing its workplace accident rate. The fatality rate alone last year was 1.9  Continue Reading »

TWC2 joins two shadow reports on CEDAW

Transient Workers Count Too joined with 12 other NGOs in Singapore to submit a joint shadow report to the United Nations Committee on Cedaw (Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women) for the upcoming periodic review of Singapore. The joint report highlights a number of issues pertaining to foreign domestic workers  Continue Reading »

HOME and TWC2 submit joint report on the exploitation of migrant domestic workers

The Humanitarian Organisation for Migration Economics (HOME) and Transient Workers Count Too (TWC2) have submitted a shadow report to the United Nations CEDAW (Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women) Committee. Singapore acceded to CEDAW in 1995. Countries who are party to CEDAW commit themselves to developing policies and regulatory frameworks  Continue Reading »

Bangladesh’s Financial Express: The plight of Singapore migrants from Bangladesh

“The root of the problem faced by Bangladesh workers is a hands-off attitude by both governments. More on the side of the Bangladesh government,” TWC2’s Alex Au was quoted as saying in an article in Bangladesh’s Financial Express newspaper, 9 September 2017. Another volunteer with TWC2, Nicholas Harrigan, added that the Singapore government should consider  Continue Reading »

Letter to Straits Times: MOM’s advice out of step with reality

On 13 August 2017, the Straits Times highlighted the case of over a dozen Bangladeshi workers from SJH Trading. They told the newspaper that they had not been paid their salaries. Most are in their 40s, and had contracts stating they were to be paid a monthly salary of $1,600, excluding overtime pay. Their main  Continue Reading »

Migrant workers in Singapore “vulnerable to forced labor, including debt bondage”, says US TIP 2017 report

Transient Workers Count Too is deeply appreciative of the US State Department’s efforts at drawing attention to the evil of trafficking in persons, through its annual Trafficking in Persons Report. The 2017 segment relating to Singapore can be found here: https://www.state.gov/j/tip/rls/tiprpt/countries/2017/271276.htm  Singapore was classed as Tier 2. TWC2 notes in particular these comments in the report:  Continue Reading »

The rough seas of debt

In an earlier story[1], Liang Lei has sketched the origins of Sikder Sumon’s salary case and the long time it took at the Ministry of Manpower. Here, Edgar Chan adds a bit more detail about the MOM process and discusses the wider context By Edgar Chan On the evening of 25 May 2017, at Isthana  Continue Reading »

Kuwait allows foreign workers to change employers without employer’s consent after 3 years of work

In a significant law change, Kuwait now permits a foreign worker to switch employer, without the previous employer’s consent, if the worker has worked three years. According to a Kuwait Times’s story dated 6 June 2016, decree 378/2016 “amended article 6 of decree 842/2015 regarding transferring workers from one employer to another”. “The employee can  Continue Reading »

Forced repatriation can lead to death, needs to be addressed

Three recent posts here at this site demonstrate that employers continue to try to forcibly repatriate foreign workers, despite workers having unresolved salary claims or untreated injuries. This practice inflicts a great injustice on them. The failure of the authorities to stop it can only lead to speculation about conscious neglect. Mark Lamb has an eye-witness account of  Continue Reading »