Tag Archives: Placement agents & fees

Employment agents, agent fees

TWC2’s top three recommendations

In late June 2017, Channel NewsAsia asked Transient Workers Count Too for a commentary article with the suggested theme of “whether we think migrant workers are an integral part of Singapore society, following reports of how many have to head back given the slowing economy.” The article we submitted (in early July) is below. After we  Continue Reading »

Straits Times: Help migrant workers stand up for their own safety

The commentary below was published in the Straits Times, 25 October 2017. John Gee For The Straits Times They form majority of workers in workplaces with high accident rates and deserve more targeted help measures Singapore has set itself the target of significantly reducing its workplace accident rate. The fatality rate alone last year was 1.9  Continue Reading »

Fraud committed using ministry letterhead

Sarowar (not his real name) approaches our help desk hesitantly. Despite being in his mid-thirties, he does not exude much self-confidence. Maybe it’s because he knows his English is weak, and what he has to tell us is fairly complicated. However, it didn’t take us long to grasp the nub of the problem: Someone had  Continue Reading »

TWC2 joins two shadow reports on CEDAW

Transient Workers Count Too joined with 12 other NGOs in Singapore to submit a joint shadow report to the United Nations Committee on Cedaw (Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women) for the upcoming periodic review of Singapore. The joint report highlights a number of issues pertaining to foreign domestic workers  Continue Reading »

HOME and TWC2 submit joint report on the exploitation of migrant domestic workers

The Humanitarian Organisation for Migration Economics (HOME) and Transient Workers Count Too (TWC2) have submitted a shadow report to the United Nations CEDAW (Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women) Committee. Singapore acceded to CEDAW in 1995. Countries who are party to CEDAW commit themselves to developing policies and regulatory frameworks  Continue Reading »

Raiful paid $8,000, job didn’t exist. Initial attempt to lodge complaint rebuffed

By Troy Lee based on an interview in July 2017 In the early hours of Friday, 7 July 2017, Md Raiful Islam touched down at Changi airport, looking forward to start on a new job. By midday, he was devastated. The job did not exist. He had paid about 465,000 Bangladeshi taka (about S$8,000) for  Continue Reading »

“Agree to lower salary, or you won’t get your pay,” says company manager

By Wahid Al Mamun based on an interview late July 2017 A lot of things can happen in two months, and Mollah Showrov has learned this the hard way. His right leg is now in held immobile in an orthopaedic boot. I notice how gingerly he seats himself in the plastic chair beside me. Here  Continue Reading »

Bangladesh’s Financial Express: The plight of Singapore migrants from Bangladesh

“The root of the problem faced by Bangladesh workers is a hands-off attitude by both governments. More on the side of the Bangladesh government,” TWC2’s Alex Au was quoted as saying in an article in Bangladesh’s Financial Express newspaper, 9 September 2017. Another volunteer with TWC2, Nicholas Harrigan, added that the Singapore government should consider  Continue Reading »

Letter to Straits Times: Set up portal for employers to hire foreign workers

This is a continuation of an exchange of letters between the Ministry of Manpower and TWC2, published in the Straits Times. The earlier part of the exchange can be seen here. Responding to TWC2’s letter published 23 August 2017, MOM’s was published on 26 August 2017: MOM: Early reporting of errant employers sees better outcomes We  Continue Reading »

Letter to Straits Times: MOM’s advice out of step with reality

On 13 August 2017, the Straits Times highlighted the case of over a dozen Bangladeshi workers from SJH Trading. They told the newspaper that they had not been paid their salaries. Most are in their 40s, and had contracts stating they were to be paid a monthly salary of $1,600, excluding overtime pay. Their main  Continue Reading »