Type of issue: job placement, recruitment and costs

1 10, 2019

What plagues migrant workers?

2019-10-15T01:23:34+08:00October 1st, 2019|Articles, Facts, research, analysis|

Dating from 2014, this featured article is a review of the inequalities inherent in the employer-employee relationship with respect to migrant workers in Singapore. Citing cases Meera Rajah came across while volunteering with TWC2, she shows how these imbalances manifest in workers' lived experiences.

31 08, 2019

$8,000 for the underground agent

2019-09-15T13:06:48+08:00August 31st, 2019|Articles, Stories|

Foreign workers are increasingly becoming illegal job agents, preying on fellow countrymen like Alamin wanting to come to Singapore. This underground activity puts Singapore's law and order reputation at risk.

27 05, 2019

More of here, less of there: Increase in repeat workers and fat profits for the underground job broker in Singapore

2019-08-30T16:30:43+08:00May 27th, 2019|Articles, Facts, research, analysis, Media Coverage, News, Our Stand|

In this research study, TWC2 found that about 80% of South Asian workers were "repeat workers", a huge change from a few years ago. We also found that about half of them used a Singapore-based job broker to find a job. Typically, these are foreign workers themselves, not licensed employment agents. It's illicit but profitable.

16 04, 2019

Seven months, thirteen extensions, no progress

2019-08-30T16:30:44+08:00April 16th, 2019|Articles, Stories|

By Avijit B, based on an interview in March 2019 Gafur has had a turbulent time since the day he arrived in Singapore. In the space of seven months, he went from the hope of steady work abroad to the frustration of being stuck without work and pay. Borrowing money from relatives to pay for

24 03, 2019

Forced repatriation still happens — Bala’s story

2019-08-30T16:30:44+08:00March 24th, 2019|Articles, Stories|

On this website, we used to carry a number of stories from workers who were lucky enough to escape forced repatriation. But that was several years ago. In the last 3 or 4 years, TWC2 received far fewer such cases. This reduction in cases could mean that attempts at forced repatriation declined, thus resulting