Tag Archives: Recruitment

Type of issue: job placement, recruitment and costs

From too much noise to an uneasy silence

By Sun Hanchen, based on an interview in January 2018 I wrote about Rajan (not his real name) in an earlier story “Worker asks for reimbursement of medical bills, sets off chain of events”.   In this story, I will recount his work history, to give readers a glimpse into a foreign worker’s experience in Singapore through  Continue Reading »

Alone in a foreign country knowing no one who can help

In the middle of March 2018, TWC2 got a call from a Sikh temple. They were sheltering a young woman who had come to them for help. We asked that she be sent to our office. Khushpreet (not her real name) was a first-time domestic worker, who arrived in Singapore just three weeks earlier in  Continue Reading »

Hossain Sabuj tells us who got rich from his working in Singapore

By Tristan Powell-Odden, based on an interview in January 2018 Hossain Sabuj, like many other migrant workers, had a dream: To open a clothing store that re-sold American brands in Bangladesh, his home country. To raise the needed capital, he would work for a few years overseas. However, because of the exorbitant amounts of money  Continue Reading »

Majority of Indonesian domestic workers in Singapore “did not get enough to eat”, says researcher

“The majority of respondents did not get enough to eat, regularly ate a limited variety of food, and often went to bed hungry in employers’ homes,” reported Charlene Mohammed in her research paper publicly available  at the University of Victoria website.  The researcher is with the university’s Department of Anthropology, and conducted her study in  Continue Reading »

Paying over $3,000 in recruitment cost for a $477-per-month job? That’s the way it is

By Aaron Chua, based on an interview in November 2017 “Hello,” says Bhimol* to TWC2 volunteer Alex Au, just as Alex is arriving at The Cuff Road Project’s meal station. “I come back,” adds Bhimol. “Huh? Come back from where?” asks Alex. “[Last] Friday, I come back. New job.” “Ah,” says Alex, but before he  Continue Reading »

The friendly man in the coffee shop

By Troy Lee, based on two interviews in October 2017 Shamim paints a picture of how he got his latest job. In the second half of 2016, while he was happily in his previous job, “I meet his man, Basir, at a coffee shop Mustafa near.” Mustafa is a well-known departmental store in the Little  Continue Reading »

MOM wrong to accuse us of ‘inaccurate’ and ‘untrue’ account

On 5 December 2017, the Ministry of Manpower (MOM) put up a note on their Facebook page accusing TWC2 of publishing an “inaccurate” account. This was in relation to the story we had posted on 12 October 2017 titled “Fraud committed using ministry letterhead“. We stand by our story. We consider MOM’s accusation against us  Continue Reading »

Greedy, unlicenced job brokers: one down, many more to go

In a promising development, the Ministry of Manpower has successfully prosecuted a Bangladeshi worker who acted as a job broker and who had pocketed some $30,900 in illicit profit. Roy Tapon Kumar pleaded guilty and was fined $30,000. This was reported in a Channel NewsAsia story (Link) and on  the Ministry of Manpower’s (“MOM”) website.  Continue Reading »

Basic salary stated in IPA is “prima facie” the applicable basic salary, rules the High Court

In a landmark judgment released 1 November 2017, the High Court has ruled that the basic salary stated in the In-Principle Approval for a Work Permit (IPA) “would constitute prima facie evidence” of the correct basic salary rate, unless the employer can prove otherwise. The bar for proving otherwise was also set very high. This  Continue Reading »

442 charges against two Singaporeans for taking money for non-existent jobs

“Terry Tan-Soo I-Hse, 39, and Clarence Lim Jun Yao, 30, face a total of 442 charges for operating and using three sham companies to collect fees from more than 300 foreign job seekers for jobs that did not exist,” said the Straits Times in a report 20 October 2017. The “sham employment businesses that fraudulently  Continue Reading »