Type of issue: skills training and costs

5 03, 2019

Why we didn’t help one worker

2019-08-30T16:30:44+08:00March 5th, 2019|Articles, Stories|

While we try to help every foreign worker who comes to TWC2 with a problem, our volunteers are realistic enough to know that some workers are not blameless. In such a situation, we modulate the help that we extend. About a month ago, a guy -- let's call him Sham (not his real name)

18 12, 2018

From overcharging to plain flouting of the law — Ratan’s story

2019-08-30T16:30:45+08:00December 18th, 2018|Articles, Stories|

By Katia Barthelemy, based on an interview in August 2018 Each migrant worker’s story is unique. Yet, in all the stories we hear at TWC2, we can detect injustice, lack of respect, abuse, illegal treatment or a combination of them. Miah Mohammad Ratan, like most migrant workers in Singapore, started his journey out of Bangladesh

6 04, 2018

Hossain Sabuj tells us who got rich from his working in Singapore

2019-08-30T16:31:06+08:00April 6th, 2018|Articles, Stories|

By Tristan Powell-Odden, based on an interview in January 2018 Hossain Sabuj, like many other migrant workers, had a dream: To open a clothing store that re-sold American brands in Bangladesh, his home country. To raise the needed capital, he would work for a few years overseas. However, because of the exorbitant amounts of money

5 02, 2017

Average recruitment cost hit $15,000 in 2015 for first-time Bangladeshi construction workers

2019-08-30T16:31:34+08:00February 5th, 2017|Articles, Facts, research, analysis|

After hearing anecdotal reports of 'agent fees' in the region of $17,000 or $18,000, Transient Workers Count Two carried out a pilot survey to determine if these were rare cases, or if recruitment costs have risen dramatically. An earlier research report published in 2012, Worse off for working? found that Bangladeshi workers needed to work

16 10, 2016

Foreign workers chained by debt, governments have a moral duty to act

2019-08-30T16:31:59+08:00October 16th, 2016|Articles, Facts, research, analysis, Stories|

By Kimberley Ng In recent years, Singapore’s slowing economy has meant fewer construction and marine sector jobs for migrant workers. What few might realise is that recruitment costs have risen prohibitively through the same period.  The two are not unrelated: it is a matter of demand for work outstripping supply of jobs. Unfortunately neither the