Type of issue: contract problems

15 12, 2018

In-Principle Approval: uses and abuses 2011 – 2018, part 3

2019-08-30T16:30:45+08:00December 15th, 2018|Articles, Facts, research, analysis, Stories|

Part 3: Getting around IPAs in salary disputes Part 2 of this series described the uneven way in which the Ministry of Manpower (MOM) officers and the ministry’s Labour Court [footnote 1] handled salary claims. Sometimes, the In-Principle Approval letter ("IPA") [footnote 2] was admitted as the basis for adjudicating claims. When that happened, employers

7 09, 2018

Policy brief 2018, no. 3: Require standard employment contracts

2019-08-30T16:31:02+08:00September 7th, 2018|Articles, Facts, research, analysis, News, Our Stand|

In the third of our policy briefs for 2018, Transient Workers Count Too recommends that it should be mandatory for work permit holders to first sign a Standard Employment Contract (SEC) even before a work permit application is made. The SEC should set out all the key employment terms, and these should be in accordance

9 11, 2017

TWC2’s top three recommendations

2019-08-30T16:31:09+08:00November 9th, 2017|News, Our Stand|

In late June 2017, Channel NewsAsia asked Transient Workers Count Too for a commentary article with the suggested theme of "whether we think migrant workers are an integral part of Singapore society, following reports of how many have to head back given the slowing economy." The article we submitted (in early July) is below. After we

26 12, 2016

MOM’s Labour Court skirted with enforcing an illegal ‘contract’

2019-08-30T16:31:35+08:00December 26th, 2016|Articles, News, Our Stand, Stories|

Volunteers at TWC2 were alarmed to hear from Sohel Rana, in mid July 2016, that the Assistant Commissioner of Labour presiding over his Labour Court case might be planning to rule in a manner contrary to written law. It would seriously undermine his claim and set an extremely bad precedent. Md Sohel Rana's case had

5 11, 2014

Bhuiyan and friends defeated

2019-08-30T16:32:58+08:00November 5th, 2014|Articles, Stories|

This is a four-part story about four workers whose employer's behaviour appears to have crossed a few red lines relating to trafficking in persons. Five months after Monir Bhuiyan and three others lodged their salary complaints against their employer J S Metal Pte Ltd, the company was still in business, presumably with good cashflow and

5 11, 2014

Bhuiyan and friends defeated, part 3

2019-08-30T16:32:59+08:00November 5th, 2014|Articles, Stories|

Continued from part 2. Part 1 narrated what happened when Monir Bhuiyan, Titu, Mahi Uddin and Shahjahan came to Singapore for their jobs at JS Metal Pte Ltd. They had each been offered $550 a month as basic salary. This was documented in the In-Principle Approval letters (IPA) issued by the Ministry of Manpower (MOM)